Telx Expands With Vantage in Santa Clara

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An aerial view of the Vantage Data Centers campus in Santa Clara, Calif. Telx will be the anchor tenant in the newest Vantage building.

Telx today announced a major expansion in Silicon Valley, where the company has leased 32,000 square feet of in a new data center being built by Vantage Data Centers in Santa Clara, Calif. The new Cloud Connection Center (C3) facility  offers colocation customers direct access to Telx’s global marketplace of customers in existing  C3 facilities at 1100 Space Park in Santa Clara and the 200 Paul Avenue in San Francisco.

The new Telx facility also continues the leasing momentum for Vantage, which has already filled all of the space in the first two data centers it has brought online on its Danta Clara campus, leasing 15 megawatts of critical power. Telx will be the anchor tenant in the third Vantage building, known as V1.

The lease in Santa Clara continues an active growth phase for Telx, which recently announced plans for its first “greenfield” data center project in Clifton, New Jersey.

Telx CEO Eric Shepcaro says the new space gives Telx more flexibility than it has in 1100 Space Park. “We found we were missing larger opportunities with customers that wanted to be in Silicon Valley rather than at 200 Paul,” said Shepcaro. “200 Paul is a great facility, but some companies just want to be in Silicon Valley.”

Dense Power Footprint

The Telx Santa Clara facility at Vantage supports power densities up to 400 watts per square foot or 16KW per cabinet in a 2N redundant infrastructure design. That’s the highest power density currently offered in any Telx facilities, said Shepcaro, who said Telx has an option on expansion space with Vantage. The newly commissioned facility is the latest addition to the campus built by Vantage, which anticipates all three buildings will earn LEED Platinum certifications and feature Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) ratings below 1.3 to maximize energy efficiency.

“We spent a good year vetting facilities,” said Shepcaro. “We worked with Vantage to come up with space that met our requirements.”

“As the anchor tenant in our Santa Clara data center, Telx now has ample room to expand and provide distinctive, high-performance data center services,” said Greg Ness, VP Marketing, Vantage Data Centers. “As our campus InterConnection Center operator, Telx will bring its considerable expertise and experience in connecting the world’s most in-demand networks, helping our other tenants at this location add value to their colocated infrastructure by building communities of interest.”

Providing Connectivity to Campus

As the retail InterConnection Center operator, Telx can offer customers at the Vantage campus direct connections to hundreds of the world’s leading carriers, ISPs, cloud service and content providers. Enterprise colocation customers in Telx’s Santa Clara C3 data center can also connect with its 200 Paul facility in San Francisco—one of the most carrier-dense InterConnection Centers in the nation.

Wholesale data center operators like Vantage typically seek to have at least one colocation provider as a tenant, as this creates opportunities for customers who would like to house equipment at the campus, but may not require the 500 kilowatts to 1 megawatt of power that typically are the entry points for wholesale leases.

Data centers are attracted to Santa Clara by the price of electricity from municipal utility Silicon Valley Power, which is slightly less than pricing for PG&E in surrounding towns in Silicon Valley. Telx is one of many data center providers bringing new space online, joining Digital Realty TrustDuPont FabrosCoreSiteVantage Data CentersQTS,Terremark and Server Farm Realty.

Telx is a privately held company that operates 17 data center facilities – five in the New York Metro area, two in Chicago, two in Dallas, four in California, (Los Angeles, San Francisco, and two in Santa Clara) and facilities in Atlanta, Miami, Phoenix and Charlotte, N.C.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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