Efficiency and Density-Boosting Upgrades for the Modern Data Center

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The modern data center is being asked to do a lot more for the ever-evolving business organization. New technologies around cloud computing, big data and IT consumerization have placed the data center environment in the spotlight. With these growing trends and more demands from companies trying to moving to the cloud, data centers are looking for ways to optimize efficiency.

Already, we have seen virtualization within the data center reach all-time highs. More so, high-density computing is making a lot of these multi-tenancy technologies possible. So, in a world of ever-demanding efficiency – how can the modern data center keep up?

According to the white paper, cloud computing, virtualization and converged infrastructure solutions decrease IT overhead and increase business agility. Big data systems extract revenue-producing insights from masses of structured and unstructured information. Not surprisingly, then, businesses are adopting all four of those technologies quickly. Consider, for example, these statistics from analyst firm Gartner Inc.:

  • 82.4 percent of total operating system deployments will be virtualized by 2016
  • The global public cloud services market will grow a projected 18.5 percent in 2013 to $131 billion. Furthermore, over 75 percent of enterprises worldwide plan to pursue a private cloud strategy by 2014.
  • 42 percent of IT leaders globally have either invested in big data or plan to do so within a year

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[Image source: Eaton]

In working with intelligent Eaton technologies, power and cooling systems can help maximize capacity and minimize waste. Furthermore, these systems work without locking companies in to a limited set of deployment options and vendors. It comes down to efficiency and flexibility within the data center. Download this white paper to learn why many data centers are ill-equipped to support today’s most important new technologies; discusses why packaged power and cooling solutions can be a flawed way to upgrade existing facilities; and describes the core components of a data center upgrade strategy capable of enhancing efficiency and power density more completely and cost-effectively.

About the Author

Bill Kleyman is a veteran, enthusiastic technologist with experience in data center design, management and deployment. His architecture work includes virtualization and cloud deployments as well as business network design and implementation. Currently, Bill works as the National Director of Strategy and Innovation at MTM Technologies, a Stamford, CT based consulting firm.

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