Halting Airflow Leaks in Data Centers with Aisle Containment

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More organizations are relying on their IT infrastructure to accomplish more. This has created a need for larger data center environments which are capable of handling both current and future demands. IT administrators are tasked with migrating to, and managing these environments. The challenge now isn’t only planning for growth; a lot is now being spent on keeping the current environment running efficiently.

Data centers have adopted various methods in keeping their infrastructures running at a more efficient state. One of those methods includes some type of a containment platform. Cold and hot aisle containment has become a widely accepted method of increasing the efficiency of data center operation. The concept of physically separating cold and hot air paths in the data center makes logical sense, and on the surface aisle containment provides a simple method to remove the chance of any airflow mixing.

The reality is, however, that the containment infrastructure of a data center can be much more complex. Part of the challenge in working with airflow containment is dealing with server airflow leakage. Ramification of Server Airflow Leakage in Data Centers with Aisle Containment is designed to help illustrate what happens when a data center allows server airflow leakage to occur. By helping the administrator understand the true real-world impacts of server airflow leakage, this white paper from Tate Access Floors establishes a better routine for making data center decisions. Download Ramification of Server Airflow Leakage in Data Centers with Aisle Containment to see how server airflow isolation is needed to create an efficient, cost-effective data center environment.

About the Author

Bill Kleyman is a veteran, enthusiastic technologist with experience in data center design, management and deployment. His architecture work includes virtualization and cloud deployments as well as business network design and implementation. Currently, Bill works as the National Director of Strategy and Innovation at MTM Technologies, a Stamford, CT based consulting firm.

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