CyrusOne Keeps Building in Houston

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For CyrusOne, there’s no place like home. The company got its start in Houston, and today announced plans to add a third data center facility at its Houston West campus. The newest building is expected to be 120,000 square feet, with 24 megawatts of power capacity. The facility will be optimized for the high-density computing needs of the oil and gas industry, a historic focus for CyrusOne, and is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2013.

“This campus will create an ecosystem that will help facilitate the generation, analysis, and sharing of all the geophysical data that is required by the largest oil and gas companies in the world,” said Gary Wojtaszek, president, CyrusOne.

CyrusOne, a subsidiary of Cincinnati Bell (CBB) just completed a 7 megawatt expansionof its Houston campus in February. The company has also completed expansions in Austin and San Antonio, and has large facilities under construction in Dallas and Phoenix. Meanwhile, Cincinnati Bell, has announced plans to spin off CyrusOne through an initial public offering, most likely as a real estate investment trust (REIT). No date has been announced for the IPO.

CyrusOne has one of the largest market positions in the oil and gas industry, doing business with nearly all super-majors and major oil and gas firms in the world. “Companies are quickly realizing that they need a specialized data center provider in order to take advantage of the new computing technologies,” said Wojtaszek. “Over the past decade, CyrusOne has developed a unique engineering capability to handle the highest density compute environments in the industry combined with an unmatched level of customer service.”

The new CyrusOne building at Houston West is expected to meet Platinum LEED certification standards by optimizing energy, which can pass along considerable operating expense saving to customers.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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