HP Updates ProLiant Servers With Latest Chips

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HP today expanded its HP ProLiant Generation 8 (Gen8) line of servers with the latest processors from the AMD Opteron 6200 Series and Intel’s Xeon E5-2400 Xeon E5-4600 products.

HP also announced new financial, support and partner programs, including the HP ProActive Insight Architecture Alliance, which brings together some of the world’s leading technology companies to eliminate manual maintenance tasks and significantly improve data center efficiency.

HP is offering new HP ProLiant Gen8 rack-and-tower servers and a new blade server with the Intel Xeon processor E5-2400 product family:

  •  HP ProLiant DL360e Gen8, a rack-optimized one-rack-unit (1U) server that supports a range of small, mid-size and enterprise organizations.
  • HP ProLiant DL380e Gen8, a rack-optimized two-rack-unit (2U) design that provides improved compute and storage capacity for data center applications
  • HP ProLiant ML350e Gen8, an expandable two-processor (2P) tower that delivers enterprise-level performance to remote and branch office environments.
  • HP ProLiant BL420c Gen8, a blade server ideal for midmarket and cost-sensitive enterprise customers, offering enhanced manageability for applications requiring high availability and performance.

HP also is adding AMD Opteron 6200 Series processor support to its HP ProLiant Gen8 line-up, with:

  • HP ProLiant DL385p, a 2U performance-based rack server designed for virtualization, database and high performance computing workloads
  •  HP ProLiant BL465c Gen8, the first server blade with 2,000 cores per rack for virtualization, database and high-performance workloads.

The new HP ProLiant Gen8 platforms are expected to be available through HP and worldwide channel partners beginning in June. Pricing will range from $1,600 to $3,500, and varies based on model and configurations.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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