SoftLayer: $78 Million in First Quarter Revenue

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A look at the racks inside the new SoftLayer Technologies DA5 data center in Dallas. SoftLayer now hosts more than 81,000 servers.

SoftLayer Technologies had $78 million in revenue in the first quarter of 2011, its first full quarter of operations since completing a merger with The Planet to create one of the world’s largest providers of web hosting and cloud computing services. The company said today that it had EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization) of $33 million from its more than 26,000 customers in the first three months of 2011.

“This has been another great quarter for SoftLayer,” said Lance Crosby, Chief Executive Officer for Softlayer. “We continue to bring game changing innovation to the market at a record setting pace and this will continue as we go forward, particularly given we have successfully completed our integration efforts with the Planet.”

That pace has continued in the second quarter, as SoftLayer has introduced a new suite of managed hosting services and expanded its operations into Silicon Valley with a new data center. SoftLayer now has 253,000 square feet of raised floor data center space spread across 14 facilities, including seven in Dallas, three in Houston, one apiece in Seattle and northern Virginia, plus the new sites in San Jose and Amsterdam. The company’s data centers now house more than 81,000 customer servers.

“The current quarter is continuing our explosive trajectory,” added Crosby. “SoftLayer has launched what we believe is a market disrupting managed hosting offing in April and I am very pleased to announce that international expansion to Europe (via Amsterdam) and Asia is well underway. This will be another great year for SoftLayer.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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