Closer Look: Facebook’s Open Compute Servers

4 comments

The Open Compute project server designed by the Facebook data center team.

With today’s launch if the Open Compute Project, the designs and mechanicals for highly-efficient servers designed by Facebook are available to the rest of the world. What’s special about them? Check out our photo gallery, Closer Look: Open Compute Server to see for yourself .

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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4 Comments

  1. ATS Guy

    This is very interesting design. I question why Facebook added dual power supplies (one 277 V AC, one 48 V DC). This would seem to increase cost of both server (dual power supply + dual corded AC/DC) and power plant (48 V DC + 480 V AC). Will they eliminate the AC UPS and just use 48 V DC UPS? Why not use 277 V AC dual corded power supply with high efficiency 480V AC UPS? The Green Grid's recent Data Center Maturity Model (DCMM) suggests use of high-efficiency UPS "ECO Mode" at level 1 maturity step. It would seem server with 277Vac dual-cord power supply and high-efficiency UPS would be a solution. Article is missing data. What is the efficiency of Facebook sever vs. traditional?

  2. AMD Nerd

    I believe the power supply has both 277V AC and 48V DC because they decided against a large UPS system feeding a 277V backup, and are just sticking to the 48V DC UPS from the rack. I like the fact the servers are very open and easy to access. Cheers!

  3. ATS Guy

    Does not say what power input they connected (either AC or DC). Just says they have boith inputs available.

  4. AMD Nerd

    The power supply can take 2 inputs the 277V AC, and the 48V DC from the UPS (in case of power disruption), which I believe means they are both connected at the same time. I picked up this info from another article here. http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2011/04/07/closer-look-facebooks-new-open-compute-servers/ Cheers!