Savvis Opens New NJ2X Financial Trading Hub

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An image from Savvis of its new NJ2X data center, which will low latency trading operations.

Savvis this week announced the opening of the NJ2X expansion to its financial services data center complex in Weehawken, N.J. The new data center allows Savvis to meet growing demand for its proximity hosting trading service, which provides low latency connectivity to global financial exchanges.

Located adjacent to the company’s existing NJ2 data center, the expansion adds 22,000 sellable square feet with a potential additional expansion capacity of 40,000 sellable square feet. The $23 million NJ2X expansion has direct fiber connection between the buildings, allowing clients to host trading applications at several Savvis “liquidity centers.”

The Savvis NJ2 data center houses servers for several major exchanges. Proximity Hosting is Savvis’ “ultra-low latency” offering, in which customer equipment is located adjacent to the exchanges’ servers within the Weehawken data center, eliminating any lag created by distance.

Proximity hosting has become popular with hedge funds, which may not be able to afford their own data center but still require low-latency access for quotes and executing trades. Savvis says Proximity Hosting clients can connect to exchange servers within 64 microseconds.

“The opening of NJ2X provides current Savvis clients the opportunity to expand their existing space and gives the company room to add new clients,” said Jim Ousley, chief executive officer of Savvis. “This addition strengthens an already solid financial data center complex and enhances Savvis’ leadership in financial markets.”

Savvis currently operates 31 data centers around the world, encompassing more than 1.5 million square feet of raised floor space designed to support enterprise IT operations.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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