Roundup: Tilera Debuts 100-Core Processors

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How many cores do you need in your processor? Upstart chipmaker Tilera is previewing a new processor featuring up to 100 cores that can work in parallel, and is touting the energy efficiency of its technology. The company claims its approach has simplified programming for multi-core processors, which has been cited by analysts as a barrier to adoption of many-core parallel processing. Tilera says its two-dimensional iMesh interconnect “eliminates the need for an on-chip bus and its Dynamic Distributed Cache (DDC) system allows each cores’ local cache to be shared coherently across the entire chip. These two key technologies enable the TILE Architecture performance to scale linearly with the number of cores on the chip.” Here’s a roundup of notable analysis and commentary from around the web:

  • VentureBeat: Tilera “believes that this hydra beast will be able to improve the computing power of data centers while reducing their power consumption at the same time.”
  • GigaOm says Tilera “is tackling the Mount Everest of chips” but adds that “new generation of cloud computing and demand for ever more resources to power social networks, online video and devices, have created challenges for data center operators that may allow Tilera to succeed.”
  • TG Daily also notes the potential application in cloud computing. “Cloud computing is a very broad term and it is obviously a huge market,” Tilera spokesperon Bob Doud told TG. “We certainly expected to broaden our foothold and market share over time.”
  • PC World notes that “the chips could serve as co-processors alongside x86 chips, or potentially replace the chips in appliances and servers.”

The Tilera chips will be available in 2010, the company says.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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2 Comments

  1. nice

    I wouldn't mind getting a hold of some of these. =)

  2. Chris

    Oh great, just what I need for my applications, 100 slow cores built on an obsolete process.