CMS Cooling System Targets Fan Efficiency

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Custom Mechanical Systems (CMS) has launched a new data center cooling solution this week at Data Center World, and has a flagship customer on board in Brocade Communications (BRCD), which chose CMS’ new InRack system to cool a new 100,000 square foot data center in San Jose, Calif.

CMS is highlighting the fan design in its InRack system, which uses airfoil blade wheels to improve aerodynamics and variable speed Electrically Commutated Motors (ECM), which CMS says allows small motors to operate at efficiencies typically seen in large industrial motors.

The Brocade data center design positions several CMS InRack systems in each row of racks, which capture warm air from the hot aisle, cool it to the desired temperature, and then deliver it back into the cold aisle. In this video we shot at the company’s booth at the Data Center World expo, CMS principal Dan Hyman discusses InRack and the Brocade installation:

 
“CMS has provided us with a state-of-the-art cooling solution that is both energy efficient, highly scalable and future-proof,” said Victor Garcia, Product Manager at Brocade.

“The innovative InRack cooling system from CMS was designed for us with several key elements in mind: energy efficiency, built-in redundancy, and an open platform which allows us to integrate any control system a facility is using,” Garcia added.

“As computer rooms have evolved into data centers and densities have increased, traditional data center cooling systems built using fan technology that is several generations old are no longer an option – they consume extraordinary levels of unnecessary energy,” said Hyman. “Our custom InRack cooling systems like the one deployed at Brocade, takes cooling of data centers to a whole new level using state-of-the-art fan technology that achieves 40% energy savings when compared to traditional suppliers.”

The CMS InRack and CRAC cooling systems are available immediately. Because projects are customized for each customer, the company says pricing can’t be generalized but predicts that in most cases “will be equal to or lower than traditional suppliers.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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