Lee Customizes Containers to Support DoD

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We’re seeing a number of new implementations of containerized “power and cooling in a box” solutions. Yesterday we noted Active Power’s sale of three PowerHouse infrastructure containers to support IT containers used to expand existing facilities. Today Lee Technologies announced that it will design and install containerized power and cooling solutions to expand the power capacity for an existing Department of Defense (DoD) facility in Texas. The project, which is valued at more than $3 million, got underway in June and is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

Lee Technologies said the containerized power and cooling infrastructure is designed to be “seamlessly added to – and in some cases replace – existing infrastructure without disrupting uptime at the Texas facility.” Lee provides few details on the facility – a common practice with secure government facilities – but from what we can tell, the containers are being used to expand the power and cooling capacity of the existing site, rather than support new IT containers.

“Lee Technologies is honored to have been selected by the Department of Defense to assist them with this project,” said Anthony Rizzo, Vice President, Public Sector at Lee Technologies. “Efficient power and cooling is critical to data center uptime, and Lee Technologies’ proven methodology when designing and implementing mission-critical infrastructure solutions will deliver 100 percent uptime for the duration of the DoD container project and beyond.”

Technology containers are nothing new for the U.S. military, which has used shipping containers for years to deploy IT equipment in field operations, as well as housing telecom and data equipment on naval ships.

Lee Technologies provides staffing, design and management for data centers and other mission-critical facilities. The company operates a National Operations Center in the Washington, D.C. area, and has offices in Atlanta, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Dublin, Ireland.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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