Net2EZ Confirmed as DuPont Fabros Tenant

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DuPont Fabros Technology (DFT) has identified Net2EZ Managed Data Centers as one of the companies that has leased space at its ACC5 data center in Ashburn, Virginia. Net2EZ, a national provider of colocation and managed data center services, has pre-leased a total of 2.275 megawatts (MW) of critical load, or about 12.5 percent of the power capacity of Phase I.

Net2EZ currently leases 2.275 MW of critical load at DuPont Fabros’ ACC4 data center in Ashburn. It is one of three tenants that have signed leases for more than 50,000 square feet of space in ACC5, representing 57 percent of the facility‚Äôs capacity. DuPont Fabros now expects to complete ACC5 during the third quarter of this year.

“Through this agreement with Net2EZ at ACC5 we are strengthening our relationship with a high quality and valued tenant at our Ashburn campus,” said Hossein Fateh, President and CEO of DuPont Fabros. “Moreover, this will allow smaller companies to capitalize on the level of reliability we’ve made available through our best in class data centers. Looking ahead, it is our hope that Net2EZ will serve as an effective conduit through which smaller scale companies will develop, thrive and ultimately become direct tenants of DFT.”

“As a current tenant, we believe that DuPont Fabros Technology offers the best quality data center space available in the northern Virginia market today,” said Pervez Delawalla, Chief Executive Officer of Net2EZ. “Our decision to take additional space at the Company’s new ACC5 data center demonstrates our confidence in these facilities and further strengthens a productive partnership.”

DuPont Fabros halted construction on ACC5 in November when it had difficulty completing financing. Last month the company announced that it had raised $30 million in new debt to resume and complete construction on ACC5.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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