Savvis Opens Slough Data Center in UK

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IT infrastructure provider Savvis has opened the doors of its new data center on the outskirts of London in Slough, the company said today. The new facility features 37,500 square feet of raised floor and marks the completion of a global data center expansion in which Savvis built eight new data centers in less than two years.

Savvis (SVVS) now has a data center footprint of 1.43 million square feet of raised floor in 29 facilities worldwide.

The Slough data centre was built to meet customer demand for managed hosting services in the UK. “Since Savvis announced the Slough data centre investment, requirements for hosting and managed services across EMEA has continued to grow and we have experienced unprecedented demand levels for hosting in Slough from companies in the UK and across the globe,” said Brian Klingbeil, Managing Director EMEA for Savvis. “This facility has been long awaited by many of our customers who are keen to view and host within the facility from the moment the doors open.”

The new facility incorporates the latest energy efficiency technologies, according to Savvis, which researched 75 possible locations in South East England for the right combination of power and connectivity. The Slough location is connected to two separate electricity sub-stations and has good connectivity to the national grid. It is also easily accessible from the M25 and M4 rail lines. The facility will provide business continuity and disaster recovery for Savvis’ customers, so it was important that the location was not near a flood plain, oil terminal or directly under a flight path.

The Savvis Slough facility has been awarded the ISO 27001 certificate, and  will offer a full range of Savvis’ services including colocation, managed hosting, utility computing, managed security and professional IT services, as well as proximity hosting for the financial community.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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