Telehouse to Expand NYC Peering Access

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Colocation and peering specialist Telehouse has announced plans to expand access to NYIIX, the company’s carrier-neutral exchange point at the 25 Broadway carrier hotel in Manhattan. Telehouse said it plans to extend the exchange point to its headquarters at the Teleport in Staten Island and additional carrier hotels in New York City and northern New Jersey.

The expansion will allow customers at the Teleport, 32 Avenue of the Americas in Manhattan and 165 Halsey Street in Newark, New Jersey to peer with other customers physically connected to NYIIX, which has a presence at New York’s other major carrier hotels at 60 Hudson Street and 111 Eighth Avenue in addition to the main site at 25 Broadway.


In addition to allowing easier network expansion, the move also offers NYIIX members the ability to add disaster recovery space outside Manhattan at the Teleport. Telehouse has announced plans to build new data centers in Europe and Asia – including a major expansion of its London hub – but is focusing its U.S. plans on extending the reach of its network to sell more colocation space in existing facilities.

The new Telehouse routes will be based on route servers using the open source Quagga suite of routing software. Telehouse’s expansion plans were first outlined at the NANOG 43 meeting in Brooklyn in June.

“By extending NYIIX’s reach to public and private peering switches at 7 Teleport Dr., 165 Halsey St., and 32 Ave. of Americas, Telehouse further solidifies NYIIX’s standing as the top peering exchange within the greater New York region,” said Akio Sugeno, TELEHOUSE’s Director of Internet Engineering and Operations. “Each of these expansions offers prospective media, entertainment, financial, legal, government and health industry clients extended accessibility and improved connection to major providers in a much larger network space.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.