1102 Grand Expands Colocation Space

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Kansas City carrier hotel 1102 Grand has expanded its colocation room and private cage colocation space, the company said today. The building has added 2,000 square feet of raised floor colocation space, and is adding another 4,000 square feet of caged colo space area scheduled to be completed in June.

Todd Applegate, Business Development Manager at 1102 Grand, said the expansion was driven by demand from existing tenants. “We have listened to service providers and enterprise customers who are significantly driving the demand for colocation services in our facility,” said Applegate. “By being connected to our carrier neutral Meet Me Room, customers in these new colocation areas will benefit from being a cross-connect away from a wide array of carrier networks. Since we serve such a diverse group of customers from as far away as Europe, it is exciting to see what can happen when companies utilize our Meet Me Room to do business together.”


The building’s owners have invested nearly $7 million since purchasing the building four years ago. Previous improvements included the connection to two Kansas City Power & Light power grids, completely replacing the entire primary electrical infrastructure, installing redundant cooling towers, and developing a carrier neutral Meet Me Room.

“We did more than remodel the building,” said Applegate. “We have worked together with our tenants to reinvent the facility, and these current expansions are a testament to our ongoing commitment in developing the area’s largest neutral hub for the internet and attracting global customers to Kansas City.”

1102 Grand’s Meet Me Room houses major carriers providing service in Kansas City, including AT&T, Cox Communication, Level 3, Time Warner Cable, Qwest, and Verizon Business.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.