Terremark Targets Gaming, Social Networking

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Infrastructure service provider Terremark Worldwide (TMRK) has targeted the fast-growing online gaming market with the launch of the Terremark Interactive Entertainment Group, which provides managed infrastructure solutions for virtual worlds and social networking sites.

“We are seeing significant demand for our services from companies dedicated to bringing online gaming applications, virtual worlds, and social networking sites to market,” said Marvin Wheeler, President of Terremark’s U.S. Commercial Business Unit. “Our portfolio of premium managed services is ideally suited for large-scale performance-intensive applications such as massively multiplayer online games and this group is dedicated to creating solutions tailored precisely to the requirements of these innovative applications.”


A number of hosting and data center companies offer specialized services for online gaming companies. AT&T hosts many of the largest MMORPGs, including World of Warcraft and Sony Online Entertainment’s major games. Global Netoptex (GNi) acquired a gaming service earlier this year, and hosts most of its gaming operation with 365 Main.

Terremark said it expects continuing demand for infrastructure from gaming companies. “The interactive entertainment industry is poised for explosive growth as online games continue to build mass-market audiences around the world, while the impact of virtual worlds is changing the way enterprises interact with their customers and each other,” said Manuel D. Medina, Chairman and CEO of Terremark. “Performance, connectivity and availability are critical for these applications, and Terremark’s Global Operations Platform combines a worldwide datacenter footprint, plug-and-play access to massive connectivity from more than 150 global carriers and the industry’s most advanced utility computing platform to provide the ideal managed infrastructure for companies at the forefront of this revolution.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.