Peak 10 Buys Nashville Data Center

Add Your Comments

Managed hosting provider Peak 10, Inc., has acquired RenTech, a Nashville-based data center operator and outsourcing firm for information technology services. The acquisition continues Peak 10’s expansion in its core Southeast regional market, where it now owns and operates eight data centers in six market. The terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

“This is a strategically significant move for Peak 10, as we continue to scale our business through financially sound acquisitions, aggressive facility expansions and consistent organic growth,” said David Jones, president and chief executive officer of Peak 10. “With this acquisition, we merge the knowledge and expertise of two entrepreneurial organizations and move forward with a strong commitment to the Nashville market, focusing on growth and exceeding customer expectations. The acquisition also adds further depth to our growing disaster recovery, business continuity and IT compliance solutions and strengthens our services capability.”


RenTech provides managed colocation, enterprise and web hosting and a wide range of managed services from its enterprise-class data center in the Nashville metropolitan area. RenTech’s customers include notable firms such as Rivals.com, Bondware, IASIS Healthcare, Country Wired and Resource Communications Group.

“The acquisition of RenTech by Peak 10 creates significant value for our customers and employees,” said Kenneth D. Nelson, chief executive officer of RenTech. “The acquisition gives RenTech the breadth and depth it needs to remain committed to the Nashville market by expanding our geographic footprint, product portfolio and support infrastructure with minimal disruptions to our business. Customers are going to see immediate value especially in the areas of business continuity and disaster recovery with Peak 10’s seven other data centers and private OCx network.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.