Scenes from Open Compute Summit V

SAN JOSE - The fifth edition of the Open Compute Summit clearly showed growth in the open source hardware movement, with 3,400 participants registered for the conference, 150 official member companies now part of OCP, and the announcement of multiple new contributions in servers, networking and storage. OCP aims to create highly efficient and scalable servers and data centers, following the model traditionally associated with open source software projects. Frank Frankovsky, chairman and president of the Open Compute Project Foundation, outlines the group's progress in this blog post. Here's some photo highlights from the event's first day.

Frank Frankovsky, chairman and president of the Open Compute Project Foundation, talked about the future of the Open Compute Project, and he welcomed new members Bloomberg, Box, Cumulus Networks, IBM, IO, LSI, Microsoft, and Yandex. This brings the official membership to 150. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Frank Frankovsky, chairman and president of the Open Compute Project Foundation, talked about the future of the Open Compute Project, and he welcomed new members Bloomberg, Box, Cumulus Networks, IBM, IO, LSI, Microsoft, and Yandex. This brings the official membership to 150. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

The Open Compute Summit V had a large crowd in the main ballroom when Frank Frankovsky greeted the crowd and updated them on foundation news. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

The Open Compute Summit V drew a large crowd in the main ballroom for the morning keynote presentations. Frankovsky, who also serves as Facebook's hardware guru, greeted the crowd and updated them on foundation news. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

CEO of IO, George Slessman, spoke about what his large enterprise customers want from their infrastructure - users to be persistently connected to an application. IO joined the OCP project, launching a cloud using the OpenStack cloud OS and running on OCP hardware.  (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

CEO of IO, George Slessman, said his large enterprise customers want a single thing from their infrastructure - users to be persistently connected to an application. Tuesday, IO joined the OCP project, launching a cloud using the OpenStack cloud OS and running on OCP hardware. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

The growing number of members of the OCP community can be seen in the large number of company logos displayed on signage throughout the conference. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

The growing number of members of the OCP community can be seen in the large number of company logos displayed on signage throughout the conference. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

As the Open Compute Summit kicked off on Tuesday at the San Jose Convention Center, tech company leaders from Intel, Applied Micro, Microsoft, AMD and others took to the stage to present their OCP hardware and specification contributions.

Andrew Feldman, Corporate VP and GM, AMD, holds up an ARM server board during his talk on "Disruptive Technologies in the Data Center." (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Andrew Feldman, Corporate VP and GM, AMD, holds up an ARM server board during his talk on "Disruptive Technologies in the Data Center." (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Bill Laing, Corporate Vice President, Cloud & Enterprise, Microsoft, described what specifications Microsoft is contributing to the Open Compute Project, which included documentations, CAD models, and Gerber files for its cloud server offering. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Bill Laing, Corporate Vice President, Cloud & Enterprise, Microsoft, described what specifications Microsoft is contributing to the Open Compute Project, which included documentations, CAD models, and Gerber files for its cloud server offering. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Bill Mapp, President and CEO, Servergy, spoke about how the company's Cleantech Servers were engineered from the ground up, delivering a compute fabric with extremely high I/O, high density and high scalability solutions for the enterprise. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)

Bill Mapp, President and CEO, Servergy, spoke about how the company's Cleantech Servers were engineered from the ground up, delivering a compute fabric with extremely high I/O, high density and high scalability solutions for the enterprise. (Photo by Colleen Miller.)