Green House Data Enters Dallas Data Center Market
Green House Data’s newest data center in Cheyenne, Wyoming, supplies 4 megawatts of critical power to 800 IT cabinets. (Photo: Green House Data)

Green House Data Enters Dallas Data Center Market

Launches first data center in Dallas-Fort Worth, one of country's hottest data center markets

Cloud and colocation services provider Green House Data secured a $16 million credit line from a private equity firm in late May and wasted no time putting it to work.

The aggressively expanding company announced addition of its first data center in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, one of the hottest data center markets in the country (hottest in terms of demand, not temperature, although it does tend to get pretty hot in the summer), to its portfolio.

“Dallas has been a target expansion site for us due to business density and growth metrics,” Green House CEO and president, Shawn Mills, said in a statement. “As one of the largest metros in the United States, Dallas is home to many oil and gas, technology, healthcare, and finance organizations, all of which are well-served by the Green House model of high-touch, highly compliant hosting.”

Dallas sits within the Texas Interconnection, a wide-area electrical grid that covers most of the state and is independently managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

The new cloud and disaster recovery facility brings Green House’s national footprint to 10 data center sites within nine geographic areas, spanning the Pacific Northwest, Western and Central US, Southeast, and East Coast. The Cheyenne, Wyoming-based company says it serves customers across 49 US states, six Canadian provinces, and several states in Mexico.

Earlier this year, Green House acquired Cirracore, an Atlanta-based enterprise cloud provider, and Seattle-based FiberCloud and three of its Washington data centers, including a crown-jewel facility in Seattle's Westin Building.

Because Green House is a relatively small provider, it separates itself from competitors by using wind, solar, and hydro-power for all of its operations and free cooling in its data centers year-round.

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