Seagate Launches Its Next-Gen SAS Solid State Drive
Seagate’s latest 1200.2 SAS SSD (Image: Seagate)

Seagate Launches Its Next-Gen SAS Solid State Drive

This is the first product to come out of Segate's recently formed strategic alliance with Micron

Seagate has announced the first product to come out of its strategic alliance formed with Micron -- a next-generation high-capacity SAS solid state drive.

The new Seagate 1200.2 SAS SSD leads the next-gen SSD platform. The company claims it is the first 12 gigabits-per-second SAS device to optimize dual channel throughput with up to 1800 megabytes-per-second sequential reads. Micron is also launching new SAS SSD products with this technology.

The storage giant has evolved its product portfolio to match technology trends over the years. Within the past year it picked up the assets of LSI’s Accelerated Solutions division and Flash components division from Avago and formed a new Cloud Systems and Solutions division to focus on original equipment manufacturer solutions. Phil Brace, president of this new division, will keynote the Flash Memory Summit next week in Santa Clara, talking about the combination of flash and hard drives in the future data center.

Evolving with business needs and industry trends in flash, the 1200.2 SSD is engineered for both enterprise and cloud workloads, where speed, security, data protection, and reliability are of the utmost importance. Seagate's 2.5 inch drives are offered in four tiers, balancing cost with endurance and performance, and scaling up to 4TB.

Catering to workload-optimized needs of its intended audience, Seagate said the new drives feature three levels of security: secure diagnostics and download, self-encrypting drive, and FIPS drive. They also include next-generation Power Loss Protection in the event of unexpected power interruptions.

Seagate said it will offer a 5 year drive warranty even under write-intensive workloads.

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