Overhead cable trays run along the aisles between colocation cages in one of Equinix's Silicon Valley data centers (Photo: Equinix)

Overhead cable trays run along the aisles between colocation cages in one of Equinix's Silicon Valley data centers (Photo: Equinix)

Learn to Unlock Greater Value From DCIM With Asset Intelligence

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Take a look at the modern data center and you’ll see a complex, powerful machine helping to run the world’s most important applications. When it comes to controlling and managing critical data center resources, there is a new challenge around the growing data center model.

The data center is getting bigger and more complex and so too is the asset inventory. Every new asset has an impact on the day–to–day operations of the data center – from power consumption and problem resolution to capacity planning and change management. To achieve – and maintain – operational excellence, organizations don’t just need to know the location of their data center assets, they need to know if they are over-heating, under–performing or sitting idle. So how can you create direct asset intelligence for an ever-evolving data center? What can administrators do to truly optimize their operations?

By trading in manual audits and fragmented data for real-time sensors and integrated information, organizations can not only improve how they manage infrastructure assets but also improve operations of the entire data center.

In this whitepaper form CA you’ll learn how combining greater asset intelligence with Data Center Infrastructure Management (DCIM) software enables IT and facilities departments to track assets through their lifecycle along with their operational performance and environmental conditions.

Before you start down the road of DCIM and asset intelligence, there are some key management questions to consider:

  • How are assets and their associated connectivity discovered?
  • Is it possible to categorize assets into certain groups to aid reporting?
  • Will disparate asset data be converted into standard formats?
  • Are asset moves and changes automatically captured?
  • Can supplementary asset data, for example warranty status or configuration, be integrated from other management systems?
  • Is it possible to set asset performance thresholds that trigger automated alerts when breached?
  • Can energy consumption be tracked back to an individual device?
  • What thermal conditions can be monitored in an asset’s surroundings?
  • Can the location of each asset be visualized in a 3-D representation?
  • Is it possible to model ‘what if’ scenarios involving changes to assets or data center environmentals?

With that in mind – you can begin to create your recipe for asset management success. Remember, the data center and its assets can never be separated. However, with greater intelligence on both, organizations will be able to achieve greater operational excellence and greater business value. This means enabling tools that interact with DCIM as well as asset control mechanisms to help with:

  • Capacity
  • Availability
  • Efficiency
  • Sustainability
  • Direct cost reduction

As the asset footprint in the data center continues to expand, today’s operational challenges will only exacerbate, resulting in yet more cost and complexity for both IT and facilities departments.

Download this whitepaper today to see how by combining greater asset intelligence with DCIM, organizations can ensure their data center is not only fit for purpose but also fit for the future.

  • They can tap into idle capacity
  • They can maintain higher availability
  • They can achieve greater efficiency

Ultimately, your organization will be ready when business demands come calling.

About the Author

Bill Kleyman is a veteran, enthusiastic technologist with experience in data center design, management and deployment. His architecture work includes virtualization and cloud deployments as well as business network design and implementation. Currently, Bill works as the National Director of Strategy and Innovation at MTM Technologies, a Stamford, CT based consulting firm.

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