deep_impact

Is Your Data Center Certified for an Extinction Level Event?

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Is your data center ready for an ELE? For those of you who don’t remember the 1998 film “Deep Impact,” that’s the acronym for an “Extinction Level Event.” In a blog post, wholesale data center provider Digital Realty announced that it was pursuing Extinction Level Event Certification, which would ensure customer uptime through a meteor strike.

Participants would receive real-time satellite data on threats from “near earth objects.” If an imminent meteor strike is detected, Digital Realty will deploy a proprietary Kinetic Deflection System to harmlessly deflect the object away from the data center.

“After the ELE impact, ELE Certified data centers will effectively go into ‘hibernation,'” Digital Realty said in a blog post. “The process entails sealing all exterior access points and protecting the facility from elemental hazards such as 100-year nuclear winters, global tsunamis and any potential zombie apocalypse if presented with a Night of the Comet scenario. The ELE Certification demonstrates Digital Realty’s commitment to our clients and realizing their potential and will be available starting on April Fool’s Day 2014.”

April Fool’s Day indeed. Digital Realty wasn’t the only data center company to have some April Fool’s Day fun. Mindful of the proliferation of “aaS” offerings, Green House Data announced the launch of Babysitting as a Service.

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Green House Data has a new service offering. No word if there’s any Red Bull in those sippy cups.

The company said the announcement comes alongside the creation of a new full-time position in the Network Operations Center of Red Bull Stockperson.

“The Red Bull thing, that was partly in response to our new BBYSaaS,” said Shawn Mills, CEO, in a blog post. “For one thing, we’re going to need to stay awake with all these kids around. For another, we need to keep the kids out of the Red Bull. They go crazy on that stuff.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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