The server hall of a data center operated by CoreSite, which is filing for a $230 million IPO.

The server hall of a data center operated by CoreSite, which is filing for a $230 million IPO.

CoreSite Adds Direct Connect in Secaucus Data Center

Add Your Comments

The server hall of a data center operated by CoreSite, which is filing for a $230 million IPO.

The server hall of a data center operated by CoreSite.

Customers at the new CoreSite Realty data center in Secaucus, N.J., can now order direct connections to the Amazon Web Services Direct Connect deployment at CoreSite’s existing NY1 data center in Manhattan.

By bypassing the public internet, AWS Direct Connect gives CoreSite customers access to Amazon cloud services through a private, enterprise-grade network connection. AWS Direct Connect helps customers reduce bandwidth costs, improve network security and achieve more consistent network performance.

“CoreSite is proud to expand the availability of AWS Direct Connect into New Jersey as it aligns with our commitment to delivering network-dense, cloud-enabled data center solutions to customers across the country,” said Jarrett Appleby, chief operating officer at CoreSite. “Enterprises in Manhattan and throughout the tri-state metro area can connect directly to AWS in New Jersey, obtaining enhanced security, reliability and scalability at a much lower cost to operate while maintaining optimal performance.”

Opened in December, CoreSite’s Secaucus data center was built to expand the company’s footprint of data center space for enterprise customers in the greater New York market. NY2 is the company’s first data center in New Jersey, and a sign of continuing activity in the northern NJ market. CoreSite has a site in New York at 32 Avenue of the Americas, and the Secaucus facility marks an important expansion for the provider.

In addition to New Jersey, CoreSite offers AWS Direct Connect service in Los Angeles, Silicon Valley, Northern Virginia/DC and Boston.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

Add Your Comments

  • (will not be published)