Vantage Signs 1.5 Megawatt Expansion Deal

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The exterior of a data center on the Vantage Data Centers campus in Santa Clara, Calif. (Photo: Vantage)

The exterior of a data center on the Vantage Data Centers campus in Santa Clara, Calif. (Photo: Vantage)

Vantage Data Centers has announced an expansion agreement with a leading e-commerce company, which will lease an additional 1.5 megawatts of wholesale data center space, the company said today.

Under the terms of the agreement, the existing customer is expanding its IT capacity at Vantage’s Santa Clara campus to support its growth, while also extending the term of its initial 1 megawatt lease. Vantage said it built out 7,200 square feet of expansion space in four months to meet the customer’s “unique design requirements” and delivery timetable.

“We are proud to support the continued growth of a leading e-commerce company,” said Sureel Choksi, President and CEO of Vantage Data Centers. “Vantage’s strong operational track record, willingness to custom-configure new capacity and deliver highly energy efficient facilities positioned Vantage uniquely to support this customer’s expansion requirements. This win further validates Vantage’s focus on delivering the industry’s best service experience for our customers.”

Progress for Santa Clara Market

The Vantage Santa Clara campus now supports 26 megawatts of critical IT load, and has seven megawatts of inventory available for sale. Vantage is one of several data center providers with space available in Santa Clara, which is the busiest data center market in Silicon Valley due to affordable power from the local utility, Silicon Valley Power.

Vantage now operates four data centers between its campuses in Santa Clara, California, and Quincy, Washington, with more than 100 megawatts of potential capacity.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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