The exterior of the AT&T data center in Waukesha, Wisconsin, which was recently purchased by Carter Validus REIT. (Photo: Carter Validus)

The exterior of the AT&T data center in Waukesha, Wisconsin, which was recently purchased by Carter Validus REIT. (Photo: Carter Validus)

Carter Validus Acquires AT&T Data Center Facility

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The exterior of the AT&T data center in Waukesha, Wisconsin, which was recently purchased by Carter Validus REIT. (Photo: Carter Validus)

The exterior of the AT&T data center in Waukesha, Wisconsin, which was recently purchased by Carter Validus REIT. (Photo: Carter Validus)

Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT (CVMC REIT) has acquired an AT&T data center property in Waukesha, Wisconsin. AT&T owned the building, and sold it to Carter Validus for $52 million and then signed a 10-year lease to continue using the facility.

The 142,952 square foot property is located 18 miles west of Milwaukee, and was built in 1989 by Wisconsin Bell, which was subsequently acquired by AT&T. The data center houses enterprise applications for AT&T’s business operations, and features 40,000 square feet of raised floor space and 60,000 square feet of supporting infrastructure and critical systems.

“The addition of the AT&T Data Center is representative of our commitment to acquire high quality, mission critical assets under long-term net leases with credit tenants,” said John Carter, CEO of CVMC REIT. “We look forward to adding more assets of this caliber to our investment portfolio.”

Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT, Inc. is a real estate investment trust that invests in mission critical real estate assets located throughout the United States. Mission critical real estate assets are purpose-built facilities designed to support the most essential operations of tenants. Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT, Inc. focuses its acquisitions of mission critical assets in the data center and healthcare sectors.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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