Windstream Moving Into Sabey’s Intergate.Manhattan

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Windstream has leased an 11,000 square foot space at Sabey’s Intergate.Manhattan (pictured above) for a central office and satellite antenna farm. (Photo: Sabey Data Centers)

Sabey Data Center Properties has a new tenant for its Intergate.Manhattan project. Telecom provider Windstream Corp. has selected Sabey’s New York facility at 375 Pearl Street as the site for a new central office to provide capacity for future growth as well as further protection against natural disasters like Superstorm Sandy.

Windstream will be a powered shell customer at Intergate.Manhattan, building out its own 11,000 square foot facility. Windstream has a 15-year lease for 664 kW of critical power, with the option to expand to 1 megawatt Windstream also plans to install a major satellite communications center at Intergate.Manhattan, with an antenna farm on the roof of the 32-story data center.

“Sitting at a confluence of the world’s transatlantic cable and fiber routes, Intergate.Manhattan is a crucial presence as our Sabey Data Center network expands,” said John Sabey, Presiden of Sabey Data Center Properties. “Equally important, Intergate.Manhattan will be the next and best carrier hotel on the East Coast, offering unprecedented opportunities for network carriers to expand their customer operations.”

Intergate.Manhattan will be Windstream’s third central office in Manhattan and its fourth serving the New York metropolitan area.

“Intergate.Manhattan is a secure, hardened site that provides Windstream with important network diversity as well as added protection against natural disasters like Superstorm Sandy,” said Joe Marano, Executive Vice President of Network Operations for Windstream. “In addition, it offers ample room for expansion as more and more business customers choose Windstream’s data, voice, network and cloud solutions.”

Impact of Sandy

Sabey executives said the Windstream lease demonstrates the impact of Superstorm Sandy in the site selection decisions of data center customers in the New York market.

“Clearly, the fact that Intergate.Manhattan was untouched by Superstorm Sandy was a major factor in Windstream’s decision to expand at 375 Pearl Street,” Daniel Meltzer, Sabey Vice President of Sales and Leasing, said. “This expansion will ‘future proof’ Windstream for the next 15 years.”

Sabey has scheduled final commissioning for Intergate.Manhattan for October, and is now commencing mission-critical operations at the 1-million-square-foot tower. Sabey, a Seattle-based developer, outfitted 375 Pearl Street the property with all new core infrastructure and upgraded the power capacity from 18 megawatts to 40 megawatts.

The building was developed in 1975 as a Verizon telecom switching hub and later served as a back office facility. Verizon continues to occupy three floors, which it owns as a condominium. The property was purchased in 2007 by Taconic, which later abandoned its redevelopment plans. Sabey and partner Young Woo acquired the building in 2011.

Sabey now operates 3 million square feet of data center space as part of a larger 5.3 million square foot portfolio of owned and managed commercial real estate. The company has developed a national fiber network to connect its East Coast operations with its campuses in Washington state, where it is the largest provider of hydro-powered facilities. Sabey’s data center properties include the huge Intergate.East and Intergate.West developments in the Seattle suburb of Tukwila, the Intergate.Columbia project in Wenatchee and Intergate.Quincy.

Michael Morris of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank executed the point-of-entry lease on behalf of Sabey Data Centers. Michael Rareshide of Partners National represented Windstream in the lease negotiations.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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