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Best of the Data Center Blogs for April 22

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Here’s a roundup of some interesting items we came across this week in our reading of data center industry blogs for April 22nd:

Microsoft’s ITPAC – Perfect for Off-the-Grid Computing – At the Microsoft Global Foundation Services blog, Sean James discusses the durability and portability of the company’s ITPAC modules: “You might wonder how temperatures as low as 20-below zero would affect the functionality of an ITPAC and the servers inside. The answer, it doesn’t. They are pre-manufactured with a recycled steel shell that will protect the hundreds of servers inside it from the harsh Wyoming climate. On cold days, say below 50 Fahrenheit, a portion of the hot exhaust air from the servers is redirected internally through a mixing unit on top of the ITPAC where it mixes and warms the air to a temperature suitable for the servers. On hot days, the ITPAC can pull outside air in to help cool the servers.”

Six Months After Sandy – Now What? – At The WHIR, Philip Koblence of NYI shares reflections on life after the hurricane: “Six months after Sandy, what have we learned? With the devastation that storm tore through the Metro New York area, planning for critical events has been redefined. No Business Continuity Training Program, no Uptime Institute report, could ever predict what happens under such extreme circumstances.”

Navigating China’s Paradox & Possibility: 4 Keys to Success – A the Equinix Interconnections blog, David Wilkinson offers insights on the Chinese market: “Moving into China’s capital markets as an institutional or individual investor, broker, fund manager, technology provider or any company can be daunting amidst so many variables. There are numerous regulations and policies that need to be followed for any segment of the industry and often the entrenched domestic competition are hard to displace. For companies coming into the Chinese market it is a move that requires a great deal of research and insight into the machinations of the economy – how it operates – and a keen eye for the paradoxical.”

Energy Savings for Federal Data Center Consolidation – At the Schneider Electric blog, Miles Auvil looks at a potential savings opportunity for federal agencies: “Energy Service Companies (ESCO’s) and the Department of Energy have advocated the use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC’s) for Data Centers. A few projects have emerged in the past year, some of which are viewed as pilots, but we have yet to see wide scale adoption. In light of FDCCI and the current fiscal environment a significant opportunity for IT is being missed. ESPC’s allow federal agencies to conduct energy projects with no upfront capital costs, minimizing the need for Congressional appropriations.”

Critical Considerations during a Data Center Migration – At the Data Center Design blog, Larry Davis of PTD Data Center Solutions offers tips on migrations: “Planning and perspective are critical when it’s time to complete a migration (or consolidation) of data center assets. Planning and perspective allow you to take a step back and make sure your approach holds water, allow you to check with peers in the industry for accepted best practices, and allow you to keep your job when the migration goes smoothly.”

What is a “Working” Data Center – At SwitchScribe, Mark Thiele looks at criteria for data center success: “My idea of successful isn’t just that the task was accomplished, but that it was accomplished the best way possible with the least risk and with excellent operational efficiency. I’m also a little bit of a worry wart when it comes to the environment. So when I see industry players and enterprises touting data centers that I know don’t meet my criteria for sustainable, successful and efficient operations, it bugs me.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.