OnRamp Will Build Second Austin Data Center

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The interior of the OnRamp data center in Raleigh as it was preparing to open. The company is also building a new data center in Austin, Texas. (Photo: OnRamp).

The interior of the OnRamp data center in Raleigh as it was preparing to open. The company is also building a new data center in Austin, Texas. (Photo: OnRamp).

Data center operations company OnRamp announced it is building a 42,000 square foot data center in Austin which will open early in the fourth quarter of this year. This will be the second data center for the company in Austin. The announcement of OnRamp’s Austin II project comes just a week after the company announced the opening of a data center in the heart of Research Triangle Park in Raleigh, NC.

OnRamp says the additional facility was necessitated by demand. “We are excited to open a second, enterprise-class Data Center in Austin,” said OnRamp CEO Lucas Braun. “We’re an Austin-based company, and a large percentage of our managed and cloud hosting and HIPAA compliant hosting services are delivered by our teams in Austin.” The facility is being designed for industry-leading levels of high density computing, with the capability of delivering upwards of 30kW per rack, contiguously. In addition, the SSAE 16, SOC I Type II, HIPAA and PCI Data Center will feature a separate high security area for HIPAA hosting. OnRamp’s Redundant Isolated Path Power Architecture delivers true 2N power to customers, from the utility to the rack.

OnRamp is working with Square One Consultants to oversee the design, development and construction of the facility.

OnRamp was founded as an ISP in 1994 in Austin, Texas. Its first colo customer was a year later, and It’s first managed server came about in 2000. It built its first data center with 2N power in 2003. Private Cloud came in 2007, and an investment from Brown Robin Capital followed in 2009.

The company offers colocation, cloud computing, high security hosting and disaster recovery services backed by what it calls Full7Layer support, which is, of course, support across all 7 layers including all the way to the application layer.

About the Author

Jason Verge is an Editor/Industry Analyst on the Data Center Knowledge team with a strong background in the data center and Web hosting industries. In the past he’s covered all things Internet Infrastructure, including cloud (IaaS, PaaS and SaaS), mass market hosting, managed hosting, enterprise IT spending trends and M&A. He writes about a range of topics at DCK, with an emphasis on cloud hosting.

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