Big Data Customer Wins For YarcData

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YarcData, a Cray company announced a new contract and collaboration to deploy uRiKA big data appliances at ORNL and with the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

ORNL selects YarcData

Cray  announced it was awarded a contract to deliver a uRiKA graph-analytics appliance to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).  Analysts at ORNL will use the uRiKA system as they conduct research in healthcare fraud and analytics for a leading healthcare payer. The uRiKA system is a Big Data appliance for graph analytics that enables discovery of unknown relationships in Big Data. It is a highly scalable, real-time platform for ad hoc queries, pattern-based searches, inferencing and deduction.

“Identifying healthcare fraud and abuse is challenging due to the volume of data, the various types of data, as well as the velocity at which new data is created. YarcData’s uRiKA appliance is uniquely suited to take on these challenges, and we are excited to see the results that will come from the strategic analysis of some very large and complex data sets,” said Jeff Nichols, Associate Laboratory Director for Computing and Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and YarcData partner

The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) and YarcData, announced the deployment of “Sherlock,” a uRiKA graph-analytics appliance from YarcData for efficiently discovering unknown relationships or patterns “hidden” in extremely large and complex bodies of information.  ”Sherlock,” says Nick Nystrom, PSC director of strategic applications, “provides a unique capability for discovering new patterns and relationships in data. It will help to discover how genes work, probe the dynamics of social networks, and detect the sources of breaches in Internet security.”

Sherlock enables large-scale, rapid graph analytics through massive multithreading, a shared address space, sophisticated memory optimizations, a productive user environment, and support for heterogeneous applications — all packaged as an enterprise-ready appliance. Prototype projects, led by researchers from across the country, will use Sherlock for research including understanding the natural language of the Web, learning about human social networks involving different types of online and telephone interactions, cluster finding in astrophysics, and genome sequence assembly.

“Many current approaches to big data have been about ‘search’ — the ability to efficiently find something that you know is there in your data,” said Arvind Parthasarathi, President of YarcData. “uRiKA was purposely built to solve the problem of ‘discovery’ in big data — to discover things, relationships or patterns that you don’t know exist. By giving organizations the ability to do much faster hypothesis validation at scale and in real time, we are enabling the solution of business problems that were previously difficult or impossible — whether it be discovering the ideal patient treatment, investigating fraud, detecting threats, finding new trading algorithms or identifying counter-party risk. Basically, we are systematizing serendipity.”

About the Author

John Rath is a veteran IT professional and regular contributor at Data Center Knowledge. He has served many roles in the data center, including support, system administration, web development and facility management.

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