CoreSite Virginia Project Reflects Data Center Construction Boom

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The server hall of a data center operated by CoreSite, which is building a new data center in Reston, Virginia.

CoreSite Realty says it will build a 200,000 square foot greenfield data center at its campus in Reston, Virginia. The company says it will invest $60 million in the facility, commencing construction in the first half of 2013 and delivering finished customer space in early 2014.

The expansion in northern Virginia was announced during CoreSite’s earnings release last week, and will expand on the company’s campus on Sunrise Valley Drive in Reston. The new project comes as CoreSite announces two substantial customer wins: Global Telecom & Technology (GTT) has agreed to extend its backbone network into ten CoreSite data centers, while CenturyLink (Savvis) is extending its full suite of voice and IP services into five additional data centers, giving the company a presence in all 14 CoreSite data centers throughout North America.

It also adds to the new construction in the pipeline in northern Virginia, which already has more than 5 million square feet of data center space and nearly 2 million more in the pipeline. The CoreSite project caps a flurry of announcements of new data center builds, which will collectively boost data center construction and bring significant new supply onto the market over the next year. Here’s an overview of what’s coming:

Oct. 18Apple has begun construction on its new data center in Prineville, Oregon, where it started building the first of two 338,000 square foot buildings. The initial phase of construction involves $68 million in investment.

Oct. 17: RagingWire Data Centers has agreed to buy 75 acres of land from Loudoun County in Ashburn, Vrignia, and plans to build up to 750,000 square feet of data center space on the property.

Oct. 12: Fidelity Investments has chosen Papillion, Nebraska as the site of a $200 million data center. The financial services giant, best known as a prominent provider of mutual funds, was revealed as the mystery company behind the secretive Project Photon initiative.

Oct. 10: T5 Data Centers is the latest data center developer to pursue a major facility in Oregon. The Atlanta-based company has acquired a 15-acre parcel of land in Hillsboro, Oregon and is finalizing design for construction of a 200,000 square foot wholesale data center.

Oct. 4: Data center developer Telecom Real Estate Services (TRES) has launched Block Data Center, a Las Vegas project that will showcase the company’s new strategy for developing wholesale data center space. The project on Losee Road will offer up to 13.8 megawatts of power capacity in “blocks” of data center space

Oct. 4: Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. will build a $36.8 million data center in Claremont, N.C. The company will locate the data center in the 48,000 square foot Center Point shell building in the Claremont International Business Park.

Oct. 3: Rubicon Data Centers, a new data center development company based in San Francisco, announced plans for its first data center development project in Reno, where it plans to build a 20-megawatt, 300,000 square foot data center as the first phase in a larger mission-critical campus.

Oct. 1: Sentinel Data Centers has begun development of a 420,000 square foot facility in Durham, North Carolina, which it says will be as the region’s first multi-tenant wholesale data center for large-footprint users. The company says it will have the 120,000 square foot first phase of Sentinel NC-1 available for occupancy in early 2013.

Oct. 1: Vantage Data Centers has begun construction on an additional 6 megawatts of space at its Santa Clara, Calif. data center campus, the company said today. The new phase of construction is backed by a recent expansion of the company’s credit facility from $135 million to $210 million.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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  1. Jeff

    So it sounds like the doom and gloom of companies (Microsoft, Facebook, etc) migrating to privately held datacenters and freeing up leased space was all doom and gloom? Or, is that shoe not yet dropped?