How Much Containment Is Enough?

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In an effort to create a more efficient data center infrastructure, IT and facilities administrators began working with hot air containment. Today, this more common practice is used in the industry as a design metric for a well-managed data center. Still, there are some questions around the use of air containment and how it can be best utilized. Since each data center is unique, the use of a containment design will differ based on demand, size, location, and other factors.

In How Much Containment Is Enough, a white paper from Chatsworth Products, administrators are able to better understand the decision points around a solid containment design. As organizations continue to grow, their IT infrastructure will follow suit. A larger data center translates into a greater need for good air control methods. This white paper examines the containment design and some of the following important components:
• Understanding, depending on the environment, how much containment is available.
• A look at containment leaks and conductive heat transfers.
• Methods to containing static pressure.

The whitepaper, How Much Containment is Enough, explains containment by helping administrators also understand what type of containment to use.
 Cold Aisle Containment
 Hot Aisle Containment
 Cabinet Containment
 Differences between CAC, HAC and Vertical Exhaust Duct Systems

With a denser infrastructure, there is a greater need to manage the cooling and hot air flow process. One of the key ways to accomplish this task is though some type of containment methods. Download How Much Containment Is Enough to gain a better understanding of the various containment methods and how they can help your data center.

To access Data Center Knowledge’s complete collection of data center white paper vist the Data Center Knowledge White Paper Library.

About the Author

Kevin Normandeau, is a veteran of the technology publishing industry having worked at a variety of technology sites including PC World; AOL Computing; Network World; Geek.com and International Data Group (IDG). Kevin lives in Massachusetts with his wife and two sons. When he is not in front of the computer (which is most of the time) he likes to get out to ski, hike and mountain bike.

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