Savvis Enters Frankfurt Market With New Data Center

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Savvis has built an extensive global network of data centers, serving a client base that’s heavy on customers in the financial industry. But the company, a unit of CenturyLink, didn’t have its own facility in the European financial hub of Frankfurt, Germany. Until today, that is.

Savvis observed the grand opening today of its data center in Frankfurt’s financial district, featuring high-power density for serving enterprises with Savvis’ suite of colocation, managed services, cloud computing and network services.

“Savvis’ data centre expansion into Germany signifies a major milestone in our plans to serve growing demand in the European market,” said Bill Fathers, president of Savvis. “Our multinational clients expect access to the same Savvis capabilities regardless of where they’re operating geographically; our investment in Frankfurt recognizes and supports the increasing hosting needs in this region.”

Savvis customers in Frankfurt gain low-latency market access to more than 150 global and local carriers, along with the trading systems of the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. The data centre also offers Savvis Symphony Dedicated private cloud service, with Savvis Symphony Virtual Private Data Centre (VPDC) public cloud services launching in early 2013.

“There’s strong demand for Savvis’ unmatched cloud, managed services and colocation solutions in continental Europe,” said Donald Badoux, managing director, Savvis Germany. “Frankfurt is an important market for regional and international enterprises seeking the types of scalable, cost-efficient and flexible IT solutions that we offer.”

Savvis operates more than 50 data centres worldwide, including four in the United Kingdom and the new continental Europe data centre in Frankfurt, with more than 2 million square feet of gross raised floor space throughout North America, Europe and Asia.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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