SimpliVity Gets $25 Million from Top VC Firms

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A first look at the OmniCube, a 2U appliance from startup SimpliVity that promises an “assimilated” approach to IT management. (Photo: SimpliVity)

SimpliVity’s vision for a “software-defined data center in a box” has received a big thumbs up from some well-heeled venture capital firms. SimpliVity, which came out of stealth mode last month, has secured $25 million in Series B funding led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), with existing investors Accel Partners and Charles River Ventures also participating. The new round of financing brings the company’s total funding to date to $43 million.

SimpliVity aims to bring a VM-centric approach to managing data center resources, allowing more freedom and flexibility for virtual resources. Its first product is OmniCube, a data center appliance that can automate the management of storage, computing, and networking resources in VMware virtual environments.

“SimpliVity is at the forefront of the convergence trend that is transforming enterprise IT,” said Matt Murphy, partner at KPCB. “Its flagship offering, OmniCube, leapfrogs competitive products in breadth of functionality and introduces a highly efficient, and novel data architecture. The result is an ultra-functional yet low cost data center in a box solution that addresses the most pressing issues in the data center today: cost and complexity.”

The company will use the Series B proceeds to fuel its global marketing activities as it prepares for a rapid growth year in 2013. “The customer demand that resulted from our recent launch has demonstrated that the market is starved for a solution like OmniCube,” said Doron Kempel, CEO of SimpliVity. “We are thrilled to have the backing of KPCB to help fund what we expect to be a transformation in IT infrastructure. In joining Accel and CRV, KPCB helps to form a dream team of investors who provide capital, expertise and access. Based on the unprecedented early demand for OmniCube, the first order of business is to prepare for imminent hyper-growth.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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