Peak 10 Looks for Growth in Atlanta Market

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Regional data center provider Peak 10 is preparing for growth in Atlanta. The company has opened a 2,500 square foot expansion at its existing data center, which includes a new cloud cluster. The expansion brings Peak 10’s total footprint to 30,000 square feet. Peak 10 also announced plans to build a third data center in Atlanta, with details to come later this year.

“The demand from the greater Atlanta business community has been the driver for our expansion,” said Matt Searfoss, vice president and general manager of Peak 10’s Atlanta market. ”The strategy to outsource network infrastructure, ensure business continuity through redundant systems and reduce power consumption are driving more customers to leverage our cloud capabilities.”

The additional cloud cluster in Atlanta features new network infrastructure that allows customers to easily manage Virtual Machines (VMs) and maximize cloud server resources. Cisco’s UCS (Unified Computing System) environment provides the network backbone and compute resources to ensure scalability and overall performance, while the EMC VNX series of storage arrays are optimized for virtual applications and produce higher disk performance and reliability for customers.

“Our cloud infrastructure is robust and continues to scale and expand,” said David Jones, president and CEO of Peak 10. “Because we remain on the forward curve of this technology’s evolution, we track, evaluate and deliver cloud technology benefits to our customers. Our capital investments in data center infrastructure and new cloud clusters in our Atlanta facility and sister markets position us to continue our successful history of serving as a significant business engine for our economy.”

Since its founding in 2000, Peak 10 has pursued gradual growth through expansion in greenfield markets of Jacksonville, Fla.; Charlotte, N.C.; Tampa, Fla. and Raleigh, N.C., and through acquisitions of established data center companies in Louisville, Ky.; Nashville, Tenn.; Richmond, Va. and, most recently, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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