Top 5 Data Center Stories, Week of June 9

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The interior of a Q9 Networks data center. The Toronto-based provider is being acquired by Bell Canada and a team of investors.

For your weekend reading, here’s a recap of five noteworthy stories that appeared on Data Center Knowledge this past week. Enjoy!

Internet Pioneer Vint Cerf Explains IPv6 Launch Day – Happy IPv6 Launch Day, everyone! And what does that mean? Who better to explain this than Vint Cerf, a “founding father” of the Internet and now Chief Internet Evangelist at Google. When the Internet launched operationally in 1983, Cerf recalls, no one dreamed that there might one day be billions of devices and users trying to get online.

Netflix Rolls Out Its Own Content Delivery Network – Netflix announced it has been building Open Connect, a single-purpose content delivery network (CDN), with 5 percent of Netflix data already being served from it.
Established to enable Internet providers, Open Connect will provide Netflix data at no cost to the locations the ISP desires, or they can choose to get the Netflix data at common internet exchanges.

Bell Canada Buys Q9 Networks for $1.1 Billion – Bell Canada is partnering with a group of investors to buy data center provider Q9 Networks for $1.1 billion Canadian ($1.06 billion US), the company said today. It’s the latest in a series of deals in which telcos have bought up data center companies to expand into the growing market for cloud computing services.

Blackrock: From Wall Street to Wenatchee – East Wenatchee is a long way from Wall Street. But the small town in central Washington state serves as the unlikely home for a data center for one of the major players in the financial industry. The financial services firm Blackrock operates a new data center at a mission critical campus operated by Sabey Corp.

Digital Realty Buys Campus in Suburban Chicago – Digital Realty has now entered the suburban Chicago market, acquiring a 575,000 square foot redevelopment property in Franklin Park, Ill. for $22.3 million.The three-building, 22-acre data center campus will have the capacity to accommodate up to twenty 1.125 megawatt Turn-Key Flex data center PODs, or 32.6 megawatts of IT load.

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About the Author

Colleen Miller is a journalist and social media specialist. She has more than two decades of writing and editing experience, with her most recent work dedicated to the online space. Colleen covers the data center industry, including topics such as modular, cloud and storage/big data.