UnitedLayer Upgrades San Francisco Facility

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Colocation provider UnitedLayer has upgraded one of its older data centers at 200 Paul Avenue in San Francisco to a fully redundant configuration that ensures improved availability and reliability for its customers. The company installed Mitsubishi Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) machines operating in parallel in an N+1 configuration, ensuring that power will continue to be available even if one UPS fails.

The upgrade has boosted the efficiency of the UPS systems at the San Francisco SF7 data center from 80 percent efficiency to better than 98 percent, the company said, saving overhead and significantly reducing the datacenter’s carbon footprint. The upgrade also enables UnitedLayer to support high-power-density cabinets.

“After acquiring UnitedLayer in 2010, one of the first things we did was invest significantly in SF7 to upgrade it to a state-of-the-art, highly efficient datacenter. Our engineering team did a meticulous job performing the upgrade while keeping all customer load live,” said Abhijit Phanse, CEO of UnitedLayer. “We’re proud to say we’ve had 100 percent uptime since the acquisition. We are committed to continuous investment in infrastructure to provide our customers with industry-leading uptime, while also protecting the environment.”

“We have been extremely happy with the reliability, performance, availability and service from UnitedLayer’s datacenter. The new leadership team has demonstrated their commitment to infrastructure and the growing needs of customers such as Flixster.” – Saran Chari, CTO Flixster, Inc.

UnitedLayer offers colocation, managed services, private clouds and business continuity solutions out of San Francisco, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Ashburn and Toronto. UnitedLayer was acquired in 2010 by the private equity group Accelon Capital.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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