Cologix Buys Minnesota Gateway

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Colocation and interconnection provider Cologix has continued its expansion with the  acquisition of Minnesota’s leading network neutral colocation provider, The Minnesota Gateway, located in the carrier hotel at 511 11th Avenue South in Minneapolis (the 511 Building).

The acquisition provides Cologix with a key footprint in Minneapolis, the 16th-largest metro market in the United States. The Minnesota Gateway operates the meet-me-room in the 511 building with 70 networks present.

“The Minnesota Gateway is one of the largest and fastest-growing carrier neutral interconnection and colocation businesses in the Midwest, and we are pleased to add this operation to the Cologix platform,” said Grant van Rooyen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Cologix. “The Minnesota Gateway team has created an outstanding base of customers, sound infrastructure, high touch local service and the region’s best connectivity, which align perfectly with the Cologix approach. We expect the Minnesota Gateway customers will value the benefits our broader platform offers, and we are equally confident our existing customers and prospects will be interested in the unique advantages of expanding their networks and colocation footprints to Minneapolis.”

The Minnesota Gateway operates over 20,000 square feet of space in the 511 building, which is the most connected building in Minnesota. In addition to the robust carrier ecosystem presented in the meet-me-room, the facility supports emerging cloud, financial, education and government ecosystems. The more than 100 customers have direct access to carriers, ISPs and ASPs, as well as the Minnesota Internet Cooperative Exchange.

Cologix now operates network neutral data centers in Dallas, Minneapolis, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. With the Minnesota Gateway acquisition, Cologix supports more than 550 customers.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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