Peak 10 Adds New Data Center in Charlotte

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Data center service provider Peak 10 is expanding its Charlotte operations to the University Research Park with a new 62,000 square foot facility near UNC-Charlotte.  Phase 1, which will include Peak 10’s Charlotte 4 data center, is underway and will feature 14,000 square feet of premier raised floor space. Subsequent phases will be completed as the customer base expands.

“Peak 10 continues to grow its managed services portfolio delivered via our cloud and our customer owned platforms based on increasing demand from new and existing customers,” said Pat O’Brien, the vice president and general manager of Peak 10 Charlotte. “Because of its convenient location in University Research Park, our new facility is easily accessible to businesses throughout Charlotte as well as the outlying counties. This new, enterprise class facility can also serve as a disaster recovery and business continuity location for customers that have intercity, interstate or national requirements.”

The new building is located within the David Taylor Corporate Center, which is owned by Beacon Partners. It brings Peak 10’s entire Charlotte footprint to more than 129,000 square feet. Peak 10 operates nine other technology campuses in the U.S., serving customers around the globe.

“The entrepreneurial and dynamic business climate in Charlotte has served our company well; it’s a great place to do business,” said David Jones, the president and CEO of Peak 10. “Our team delivers Infrastructure-as-a-Service to many of the 240+ energy-oriented organizations, in addition to high-growth technology companies, making Peak 10 a backbone to the Charlotte region’s economic growth and stability. We are committed to this region and it shows through the expansion of our local operations three times over the last seven years and continued, steady growth planned over the next 5-10 years.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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