Equinix Accelerates Expansion in Sydney

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The colocation area inside the Equinix SY3 data center in Sydney, Australia. (Source: Equinix).

Over the past several years, Equinix has been focusing on expansion in the Asia Pacific region, an effort that continues with today’s announcement that the colocation provider has begun construction of phase two of its third Sydney data center six months ahead of schedule. The company is investing an additional $50 million to double the number of cabinets to 2,000.

Equinix (EQIX) said the decision to accelerate the expansion of its SY3 data center was driven by high demand for colocation and interconnection services from cloud and financial service providers. Phase one of  SY3, which opened only last year, has seen rapid uptake. with more than 60 new customers, reflecting the growth of Australia’s cloud computing industry.

“Responding to increased demand from the cloud and financial services community, we’re committed to make an additional 1,000 cabinets in SY3 available as early as September 2012, six months ahead of schedule,” said Tony Simonsen, country manager, Equinix Australia. “Interconnections within our sites have accelerated, showing that our customers are leveraging Platform Equinix to accelerate the growth of their business.”

One of the tenants in Equinix SY3 is Brennan IT, which is rolling out its cloud services platform to small and medium sized enterprise customers, leveraging SY3’s connectivity options from 65 telecommunication networks.

“As we’re doubling our cloud investment every nine months, the relationship with Equinix forms an important part of our overall cloud strategy,”  said managing director, Dave Stevens, Brennan IT. “We welcome Equinix’s plan to bring forward the investment in phase two of SY3, which will offer us further room for growth as we expand our cloud and managed services portfolio for SMEs.”bout Equinix

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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