Connectria Launches IBM i Cloud Hosting

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Managed hosting provider Connectria Hosting has launched a cloud solution for the IBM i platform based upon two years of testing, development and research done in cooperation with IBM. Connectria’s IBM i Cloud Hosting Solutions are designed to run on IBM Power Systems Servers. Customers of Connectria’s IBM i Cloud Hosting Solutions will be able to purchase IBM i capacity and support.

Starting at $495 a month, Connectria’s IBM i Cloud Hosting solutions offer an alternative to purchasing an IBM i System. For each Virtual Machine, customers can add processor, memory or disk capacity as needed, as well as scale from as little as 595 CPW to more than 50,000 CPW.

“The Power Systems platform has been an excellent technology in which Connectria has established strong expertise,” said Rich Waidmann, Connectria CEO and President. “We are very excited to offer these Cloud Solutions for a technology with such longevity and value. Now customers can leverage Connectria’s superior IBM i managed hosting services in a flexible and affordable cloud computing environment.”

Connectria provides three IBM i Cloud Hosting options to optimize a customer’s cost, performance and uptime needs. Alternatives include Connectria Silver Cloud for IBM i (virtual machines running on a single IBM POWER7 server, lower-cost option), Connectria Gold Cloud for IBM i (virtual machines running on fault-tolerant, clustered IBM POWER7 servers) and Connectria Platinum Cloud for IBM i (virtual machines running on two separate IBM POWER7 servers replicated across multiple data centers).

Connectria provides complex hosting solutions for more than 1,000 customers in over 30 countries worldwide. It maintains a “No Jerks Allowed” policy to assure customers that employees will “go the extra mile” to support them.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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