DataBank Expands With North Dallas Data Center

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DataBank Holdings will develop a major data center facility in north Dallas, the company said today. The new facility expands Databank’s presence in the Dallas market, where the company operates more than 140,000 square feet of space in a former Federal Reserve Bank facility in downtown Dallas.

Databank is renovating an existing building within a business park, which will be converted into build-to-suit data halls (“pods”) in a multi-phase construction process. Facility specifications include dual 10MW utility feeds, a custom high density power delivery architecture, and access to top network providers. DataBank plans to open the facility in the fourth quarter of this year.

“We are very pleased to announce this important regional expansion,” said Tim Moore, CEO of DataBank. “We have a strong presence in this market, and with this new facility we are clearly executing on our announced growth plans. This latest investment exhibits DataBank’s commitment to our Enterprise and Cloud computing clients who wish to expand with us in the North Dallas area.”

Moore joined DataBank after the company was acquired by Avista Capital last June. Avista, a private equity firm with about $4 billion in capital, said it intends to invest in expanding DataBank’s data center footprint, and may acquire other properties or companies.

The new project by DataBank continues an active period of data center development in the Dallas market, where Digital Realty, CyrusOne and Stream Data Centers all have properties under development.

DataBank operates six data centers within 400 South Akard, a seven-story building constructed in 1921 to house the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. In 2000 the building was renovated as a technology and telecom hub, taking advantage of security features from its use as a banking facility.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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