Digital Realty: Strong Demand Seen in Asian Markets

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More than three quarters of enterprise companies in Singapore, Australia and Hong Kong expect to expand their data center infrastructure this year, according to a new survey commissioned by Digital Realty Trust. Of those with expansion plans, nearly half say they will likely add space in more than one location.

The study, conducted by Campos Research & Analysis , surveyed more than 300 IT decision makers at large corporations in Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong with annual revenues of at least US$500 million and/or at least 500 employees. All participants are directly involved in the process of managing, executing contracts for, implementing or expanding data centres.

Highlights of the survey results included:

  • 76 percent of respondents will definitely or probably expand their data centre infrastructure in 2012.
  • 17 percent of respondents report no plans for data centre projects in 2012 or 2013.
  • 48 percent of respondents considering new data centre projects would expand in more than one location.
  • 64 percent of respondents also reported having built a new data centre in the previous 24 months.

“The results of this independent study verify the strong demand for data centre space that we are seeing in our Asia Pacific markets,” said Kris Kumar, Regional Head, Asia Pacific at Digital Realty. “We believe this growth is primarily being driven by global enterprises seeking to establish or expand their technical operations in the Asia Pacific region, as well as by companies based in the region with expanding computing requirements to support their rapid growth. While not yet in Hong Kong, our assets in Singapore, Sydney and Melbourne are well-positioned to capture a significant portion of this demand expected in the coming 24 months.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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