Eucalyptus Launches Test Lab at CoreSite

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Eucalyptus Systems has launched a new enterprise-class cloud test lab offering at CoreSite Realty’s Bay area data center campus to address the growing demand for cloud computing technologies, the companies said today.

Eucalyptus offers an open source cloud software platform for on-premise Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) that allows enterprises to create private and hybrid clouds. The Eucalyptus Cloud Test Lab provides enterprises with a secure, fully functional hosted IaaS cloud to validate their cloud application migration strategies prior to implementation. Customers can purchase the exact cloud environment used during the testing phase.

“By validating the technical and business benefits of specific use cases prior to migration, enterprises can deploy hosted private and hybrid clouds with a new level of confidence,” said David Butler, SVP of Marketing at Eucalyptus. “As part of Cloud Test Lab, customers can leverage the Eucalyptus partner ecosystem to evaluate a complete cloud solution, and benefit from a customer-focused, best-of-breed systems management approach.”

“CoreSite is pleased to provide the data center infrastructure to support Eucalyptus’ new Cloud Test Lab offering,” said Brian Warren, VP of Product Management at CoreSite. “This offering provides our enterprise data center customers with a secure, risk-managed testing environment for their cloud migration strategies. The Eucalyptus Cloud Test Lab demonstrates CoreSite’s commitment to developing Cloud computing ecosystems for our customers.”

Eucalyptus’ Cloud Test Lab will operate on innovative Dell infrastructure provided by Dasher Technologies. The official product launch date is set for March 1.

CoreSite Realty (COR) is a national provider of data centers and interconnection services. The company houses 700 customers on infrastructure including more than two million square feet of space across 12 data centers in seven key U.S. markets.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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