NL-ix Plans ‘Super-Core’ at Equinix Amsterdam

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The Internet exchange NL-ix will establish a “super-core-site” with up to 100 Gbit/s port- apacity in the new Equinix AM3 facility in Amsterdam, the companies said today. The new node will enhance traffic performance for both NL-ix and Equinix customers, enabling them to peer across the NL-ix infrastructure to improve performance and reduce costs.

Scheduled for completion in Q3 2012, the 6,400 square meter (68,000 square foot) AM3 facility is located in Amsterdam Science Park which, with over 250 networks, is one of the highest-density network zones in continental Europe.

The majority of NL-ix’s 43 sites in the Netherlands are access sites, offering 100 Mbit/s and 1 Gbit/s connections. There are also 24 “core sites” equipped with Brocade MLX switches and interconnected with multiple dark fibers and multiple 10 Gbit/s connections. Of these 24 core sites there are currently two “super-core-sites” which connect all the core-nodes and handle the majority of NL-ix traffic via these 100Gbit/s-capable switches. The AM3 facility will house a third “super-core-site.”

“The new Equinix data center is strategically located in one of the highest-density network zones in continental Europe, so it makes a great deal of sense to establish a high-capacity node in this state-of-the-art facility,” said Jan Hoogenboom, NL-ix CEO. “All of our members, as well as Equinix’s extensive customer base, stand to benefit substantially from the new node.”

“Hosting an NL-ix super-core-node gives our new facility an excellent head start where connectivity providers and their customers are concerned,” said Equinix Netherlands Managing Director Michiel Eielts. “Combined with the dynamic network, cloud and content ecosystems at work in Platform EquinixÔ, the new AM3 facility will be well placed to enable customer growth in one of Europe’s most dynamic, fast-growing and network-rich locations.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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