Connectria Offers Oracle SaaS Hosting for ISVs

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Connectria Hosting will offer its independent software vendor (ISV) customers access to Oracle software through Oracle’s SaaS for ISVs model, the company said this week. The service allows ISVs to use Oracle software on a monthly basis provided they are delivering an application in a one-to-many hosted commercial deployment. Since Connectria’s hosting fees are based upon a fixed monthly cost, ISVs are now able to deploy and manage a hosted SaaS solution at an attractive price point with no upfront license investment.

Connectria is a St. Louis-based company that specializes in complex hosting. As a Gold level member of Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN), Connectria has extensive experience hosting Oracle Database and Oracle Real Application Clusters, Oracle WebLogic Server, Oracle Solaris, and Oracle Applications.

“Oracle’s product offerings remove barriers for ISVs to enter and flourish in the SaaS market segment, delivering enterprise grade security, scalability and reliability to their customers,” said Rich Waidmann, Connectria President and CEO. “Oracle’s SaaS for ISVs program makes it easier for Connectria to provide a hosted option at a relatively low cost. The ISV benefits from predictable, fixed monthly pricing and they’re able to focus upon developing and marketing SaaS software, not running servers.”

The Oracle SaaS for ISVs model is appropriate both for ISVs transitioning to SaaS, Connectria said, as well as those seeking to strengthen their existing SaaS offerings. The model also enables ISVs to scale their software license investments as they grow.

The Oracle products available through the SaaS for ISVs model include Oracle Database and Oracle WebLogic Server. Also available are Oracle Database options, including Oracle Real Application Clusters, Oracle Partitioning and Oracle Active Data Guard.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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