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Stream Expands With Houston Data Center

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An illustration of the planned Stream Data Centers facility in Houston.

Stream Data Centers is expanding again with a new development in the Houston market, the company said this week. Stream has acquired 7.6 acres of land in The Woodlands, Texas, a master-planned community north of Houston, where it plans to build a 72,500 square foot Stream Private Data Center (PDC). The ground-up (greenfield) data center will be built to withstand sustained 146-mph straight-line winds, and is being designed to achieve LEED Gold Certification.

The data center will initially deliver 4.5 megawatts of critical power, with the ability to expand to 9 MW, with all necessary conduit and pads already in place. The raised-floor area will be divided into three dedicated 10,000-square-foot data halls. The site has access to power and fiber infrastructure and will be equipped with 72 hours of onsite fuel storage.

Demand Seen From Multiple Sectors

“Stream’s Private Data Center in Houston continues our Texas expansion and provides an excellent addition to our portfolio,” said Paul Moser, co-managing director of Stream Data Centers. “The demand for data center space in Houston is strong and this ground-up, purpose-built facility will provide enterprise users with an attractive wholesale option in Houston’s premier master-planned community.”

Like many of Stream’s previous projects, the Houston data center is a speculative development based on demand for data center space from local companies. Stream said it is seeing strong demand from sectors including energy, healthcare, and financial services. Twenty three Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Houston.

Stream Data Centers will break ground in February and the facility will be fully-commissioned and ready for occupancy in December 2012. Stream is also developing a Private Data Center in Richardson, Texas, which will be complete in May.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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