CyrusOne Expands Wth San Antonio Data Center

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Colocation provider CyrusOne is entering the San Antonio market, and has bought property in the Westover Hills business park where it will build a data center. The new facility will complete CyrusOne’s Texas expansion plans, which have focused on developing data center facilities in the four major commercial markets in the state.

The new data center will sit on 10 acres of land, have more than 20 megawatts of power and provide customers with “a significant amount of data center and office space,” the company said. The facility is under construction and will be available for customer installation the second quarter of 2012.

CyrusOne, a wholly owned subsidiary of Cincinnati Bell (CBB) has been in expansion mode in recent months. The company is currently working on expansion proects in Houston, Austin, Dallas, Cincinnati and Phoenix. It has also opened facilities in London and Singapore.

“Over the past three years we have been focused on creating the largest data center portfolio in the state of Texas and the expansion into San Antonio is a natural progression of this strategy,” said Gary Wojtaszek, President and CEO of CyrusOne. Once completed, CyrusOne will be the only provider in the state of Texas with enterprise class data centers in Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio.

The Westover Hills section of San Antonio is home to a data center cluster that includes a major data center for Microsoft. Other companies with data centers n Westover Hills include  Frost Bank, Valero, Lowe’s and Christus Health System

San Antonio is the seventh-largest city in the U.S. with more than 1.3 million residents, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Affordable land is plentiful, and the city has a favorable profile for natural disasters, with no history of earthquakes and an average of one tornado a year. San Antonio is about 120 miles inland, blunting the potential impact of all but the most powerful hurricanes.

Another reasons San Antonio has become a poular data center destination is the availability of recycled water for use in cooling towers. The San Antonio Water System has been offering recycled water to its industrial customers since 1996. Recycled “grey” water isn’t fresh or drinkable but is not contaminated by any toxic substances or toilet wastes, and is considered environmentally friendly because it reduces demands for fresh water.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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