CentriLogic Opens New Data Center in Toronto

Add Your Comments

Citing strong demand for outsourced IT operations, CentriLogic has opened a new data center on York Street in downtown Toronto. The 16,000 square-foot facility is within a few hundred feet of 151 Front Street, the “carrier hotel” that serves as Canada’s primary network hub. The location enables CentriLogic to offer managed hosting and cloud computing services with optimal network, bandwidth and latency capabilities.

“Our new facility fulfills the requirements set by customers wishing to outsource their IT infrastructure to a data center in the downtown core, directly within Canada’s telecommunications epicenter,” said Robert Offley, President and CEO at CentriLogic.

The company’s existing infrastructure consists of redundant interconnected data centers in Southern Ontario and Western New York, with expansion programs in place at facilities in Western Canada and Europe.

Growth Seen for Ontario Market

“It is expected that the Canadian hosting market will grow 11% in 2012,” said Mark Schrutt, Director, Services & Enterprise Applications, for IDC Canada. “Ontario is the largest segment and Toronto is particularly strong due to heavy demand, where demand outstrips supply. This expansion in Toronto’s downtown core provides needed capacity for Centrilogic’s portfolio of hosting and cloud services.”

CentriLogic says the mix of services desired by customers is evolving, and the new space provides additional flexibility to adapt to these demands.

“CentriLogic’s current infrastructure at 151 Front Street is primarily allocated to virtual hosting and cloud computing environments,” said Jim Latimer, CentriLogic’s Chief Strategy Officer. “For some customers, however, virtualization and cloud may not be the most appropriate solutions. For others, the transition from a traditional co-located environment to a virtual environment will take place over time. CentriLogic will utilize the new facility to extend our existing downtown infrastructure, and provide tailored, hybrid hosting solutions designed to accommodate each customer’s unique needs.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

Add Your Comments

  • (will not be published)