SoftLayer Hits 100,000 Servers

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A look at some of the densely-populated racks within the new SoftLayer data center in Singapore.

IT infrastructure service provider SoftLayer Technologies now has more than 100,000 servers running in its data centers, the company said last week. The Dallas-based provider has added 14,000 servers this year, reflecting strong demand for its cloud computing and automated hosting services.

SoftLayer becomes the second hosting company to publicly report more than 100,000 servers, following the lead of French provider OVH.

The growth also leaves SoftLayer tied with OVH for the top spot in our listing of Who Has The Most Web Servers? (which includes cloud computing providers, content delivery providers an enterprise companies as well as hosts).

Here’s the short list of the largest hosting companies:

  • OVH: 100,000 dedicated servers (Source: Company forum)
  • SoftLayer: Dallas-based SoftLayer now has more than 100,000 servers under management, and is growing rapidly. (Source: Company press release).
  • Rackspace: The strong growth of the Rackspace Cloud has boosted the total for this San Antonio-based provider to 78,717 servers as of Sept. 30, 2100 (Source: Company press release)
  • 1&1 Internet: German hosting giant 1&1 says it has “more than 70,000″ servers on its company web site, but hasn’t updated that number since early 2010. We suspect it’s somewhat higher by this point, and will revise this if and when 1&1 updates with current numbers.

SoftLayer has significantly expanded its global infrastructure this year, with new network points of presence along with new data centers in Singapore and Amsterdam. The new PoPs will be located in London, Paris, Frankfurt, Moscow, Tokyo and Hong Kong.

SoftLayer had $85 million in revenue in the third quarter of 2011, up from $83 million in revenue in the second quarter of 2011, and $78 million in the first quarter.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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