QTS Earns LEED Gold in Atlanta Facility

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The exterior of the QTS Metro Atlanta data center.

QTS (Quality Technology Services), a data center facilities and managed services company, announced a series of energy efficiency investments, including achieving Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certification for its Atlanta Metro facility.

“We understand the difficulty in achieving LEED in a multi-tenant data center where individual tenant agreements require specific temperature and humidity guidelines,” said Rick Fedrizzi, president, chief operating officer, and founding chair of the U.S. Green Building Council. Since purchasing and upgrading the 990,000-square-foot Atlanta Metro Data Center in 2007, QTS has devoted 4.5 acres of roof space for rain water capture to be used for cooling and, since January 2010, QTS has improved the power usage effectiveness (PUE) at Atlanta Metro by 11.4 percent.

This past summer, the company engaged the Environmental Defense Fund’s (EDF) Climate Corps Program, a summer fellowship program that places specially-trained MBA and MPA students in organizations to help drive energy efficiency, to further reduce QTS’ carbon footprint.

“As we implement our EDF fellow’s recommendations through a $10 million multi-year investment, we strive to be not only good stewards of resources, but pass cost savings through to our customers who have an interest in going green,” said Brian Johnston, chief technology officer, QTS. “Our entire company continues to focus on a team approach to obtain greater efficiencies, and we expect these improvements to continue.”

This QTS video gives an overview of the company’s green initiatives.

For additional videos, check out our DCK video archive and the Data Center Videos channel on YouTube.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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